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  1. Checklist WHO
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please go to Library section.

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Roads

  • Roads have adequate non-slip, regularly spaced pedestrian crossings ensuring that it is safe for pedestrians to cross the road.
  • Roads have well-designed and appropriately placed physical structures, such as traffic islands, overpasses or underpasses, to assist pedestrians to cross busy roads.
  • Pedestrian crossing lights allow sufficient time for older people to cross the road and have visual and audio signals.

sécurite
Safety

  • Public safety in all open spaces and buildings is a priority and is promoted by, for example, measures to reduce the risk from natural disasters, good street lighting, police patrols, enforcement of by-laws, and support for community and personal safety initiatives.

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Pavements

  • Pavements are well-maintained, smooth, level, non-slip and wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs with low curbs that taper off to the road.
  • Pavements are clear of any obstructions (e.g. street vendors, parked cars, trees, dog droppings, snow) and pedestrians have priority of use.

Sentier
Green spaces and walkways

  • There are well-maintained and safe green spaces, with adequate shelter, toilet facilities and seating that can be easily accessed.
  • Pedestrian-friendly walkways are free from obstructions, have a smooth surface, have public toilets and can be easily accessed.

Maisons
Services

  • Services are clustered, located in close proximity to where older people live and can be easily accessed (e.g. are located on the ground floor of buildings).
  • There are special customer service arrangements for older people, such as separate queues or service counters for older people.

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Outdoor seating

  • Outdoor seating is available, particularly in parks, transport stops and public spaces, and spaced at regular intervals; the seating is well-maintained and patrolled to ensure safe access by all.

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Public toilets

  • Public toilets are clean, well-maintained, easily accessible for people with varying abilities, well-signed.

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Environment

  • The city is clean, with enforced regulations limiting noise levels and unpleasant or harmful odours in public places.

Lumière
Traffic

  • There is strict enforcement of traffic rules and regulations, with drivers giving way to pedestrians.

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Cycle paths

  • There are separate cycle paths for cyclists.

  1. Checklist WHO
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please go to Library section.

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Travel destinations

  • Public transport is available for older people to reach key destinations such as hospitals, health centres, public parks, shopping centres, banks and seniors' centres.
  • All areas are well-serviced with adequate, well-connected transport routes within the city (including the outer areas) and between neighbouring cities.
  • Transport routes are well-connected between the various transport options.

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Roads

  • Roads are well-maintained, wide and well-lit, have appropriately designed and placed traffic calming devices, have traffic signals and lights at intersections, have intersections that are clearly marked, have covered drains, and have consistent, clearly visible and well-placed signage.
  • The traffic flow is well-regulated.
  • Roads are free of obstructions that might block a driver’s vision.
  • The rules of the road are strictly enforced and drivers are educated to follow the rules.

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Transport stops and stations

  • Designated transport stops are located in close proximity to where older people live, are provided with seating and with shelter from the weather, are clean and safe, and are adequately lit.
  • Stations are accessible, with ramps, escalators, elevators, appropriate platforms, public toilets, and legible and well-placed signage.
  • Transport stops and stations are easy to access and are located conveniently.
  • Station staff are courteous and helpful.

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Transport drivers

  • Drivers are courteous, obey traffic rules, stop at designated transport stops, wait for passengers to be seated before driving off, and park alongside the curb so that it is easier for older people to step off the vehicle.

Information
Information

  • Information is provided to older people on how to use public transport and about the range of transport options available.
  • Timetables are legible and easy to access.
  • Timetables clearly indicate the routes of buses accessible to disabled people.

Voiture
Taxis

  • Taxis are aff ordable, with discounts or subsidized taxi fares provided for older people with low incomes.
  • Taxis are comfortable and accessible, with room for wheelchairs and/or walking frames.
  • Taxi drivers are courteous and helpful.

Voiture
Age-friendly vehicles

  • Vehicles are accessible, with floors that lower, low steps, and wide and high seats.
  • Vehicles are clean and well-maintained.
  • Vehicles have clear signage indicating the vehicle number and destination.

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Parking

  • Affordable parking is available.
  • Priority parking bays are provided for older people close to buildings and transport stops.
  • Priority parking bays for disabled people are provided close to buildings and transport stops, the use of which are monitored.
  • Drop-off and pick-up bays close to buildings and transport stops are provided for handicapped and older people.

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Affordability

  • Public transportation is affordable to all older people.
  • Consistent and well-displayed transportation rates are charged.

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Reliability and frequency

  • Public transport is reliable and frequent (including services at night and at weekends).

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Specialized services

  • Sufficient specialized transport services are available for people with disabilities.

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Priority seating

  • Priority seating for older people is provided, and is respected by other passengers.

Sécurité
Safety and comfort

  • Public transport is safe from crime and is not overcrowded.

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Community transport

  • Community transport services, including volunteer drivers and shuttle services, are available to take older people to specific events and places.

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Driving competence

  • Refresher driving courses are provided and promoted.

  1. Checklist WHO
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please refer to the Library section.

Maisons
Design

  • Housing is made of appropriate materials and well-structured.
  • There is sufficient space to enable older people to move around freely.
  • Housing is appropriately equipped to meet environmental conditions (e.g. appropriate air-conditioning or heating).
  • Housing is adapted for older people, with even surfaces, passages wide enough for wheelchairs, and appropriately designed bathrooms, toilets and kitchens.

Maison
Ageing in place

  • Housing is located close to services and facilities.
  • Affordable services are provided to enable older people to remain at home, to “age in place”.
  • Older people are well-informed of the services available to help them age in place.

Maisons
Maintenance

  • Maintenance services are affordable for older people.
  • There are appropriately qualified and reliable service providers to undertake maintenance work.
  • Public housing, rented accommodation and common areas are well-maintained.

Maisons
Modifications

  • Housing is modified for older people as needed.
  • Housing modifications are affordable.
  • Housing modifications are affordable.
  • Equipment for housing modifications is readily available.
  • Financial assistance is provided for home modifications.
  • There is a good understanding of how housing can be modified to meet the needs of older people.

Maisons
Habitations

  • Des logements pour personnes âgées en nombre suffisant et d’un prix abordable sont disponibles dans le quartier.
  • Les résidences pour personnes âgées offrent un choix de services, d’équipements et d’activités appropriés.
  • Les habitations pour personnes âgées sont intégrées dans la communauté environnante.

Sécurité
Environment

  • Older people are comfortable in their housing environment.
  • Housing is not located in areas prone to natural disasters.
  • Older people feel safe in the environment they live in.
  • Financial assistance is provided for housing security measures.

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Affordability

  • Affordable housing is available for all older people.

Maisons
Essential services

  • Essential services are provided that are affordable to all.

Maisons
Community integration

  • Housing design facilitates continued integration of older people into the community.

Maisons
Living

  • Housing is not overcrowded.

  1. Feuille de route OMS
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please refer to the Library section.

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Accessibility of events and activities

  • The location is convenient to older people in their neighbourhoods, with affordable, flexible transportation.
  • Older people have the option of participating with a friend or caregiver.
  • Times of events are convenient for older people during the day.
  • Admission to an event is open (e.g. no membership required) and admission, such as ticket purchasing, is a quick, one-stop process that does not require older people to queue for a long time.

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Affordability

  • Events and activities and local attractions are affordable for older participants, with no hidden or additional costs (such as transportation costs).
  • Voluntary organizations are supported by the public and private sectors to keep the costs of activities for older people affordable.

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Facilities and settings

  • Gatherings, including older people, occur in a variety of community locations, such as recreation centres, schools, libraries, community centres in residential neighbourhoods, parks and gardens.
  • Facilities are accessible and equipped to enable participation by people with disabilities or by those who require care.

Personnes
Addressing isolation

  • Personal invitations are sent to promote activities and encourage participation.
  • Events are easy to attend, and no special skills (including literacy) are required.
  • A club member who no longer attends activities is kept on the club’s mailing and telephone lists unless the member asks to be taken off.
  • Organizations make efforts to engage isolated seniors through, for example, personal visits or telephone calls.

Groupe
Fostering community integration

  • Community facilities promote shared and multipurpose use by people of different ages and interests and foster interaction among user groups.
  • Local gathering places and activities promote familiarity and exchange among neighbourhood residents.

  1. Checklist WHO
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please refer to the Library section.

Consultation
Respectful and inclusive services

  • Older people are consulted by public, voluntary and commercial services on ways to serve them better.
  • Public and commercial services provide services and products adapted to older people’s needs and preferences.
  • Services have helpful and courteous staff trained to respond to older people.

Bonhommes
Intergene-
rational and family interactions

  • Community-wide settings, activities and events attract people of all ages by accommodating age-specific needs and preferences.
  • Older people are specifically included in community activities for “families”.
  • Activities that bring generations together for mutual enjoyment and enrichment are regularly held.

Stylo
Public education

  • Learning about ageing and older people is included in primary and secondary school curricula.
  • Older people are actively and regularly involved in local school activities with children and teachers.
  • Older people are provided opportunities to share their knowledge, history and expertise with other generations.

Bonhommes
Community inclusion

  • Older people are included as full partners in community decision-making affecting them.
  • Older people are recognized by the community for their past as well as their present contributions.
  • Community action to strengthen neighbourhood ties and support include older residents as key informants, advisers, actors and beneficiaries.

Homme
Public images of ageing

  • The media include older people in public imagery, depicting them positively and without stereotypes.

Argent
Economic inclusion

  • Economically disadvantaged older people enjoy access to public, voluntary and private services and events.

  1. Checklist WHO
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please go to Library section.

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  • There is a range of options for older volunteers to participate.
  • Voluntary organizations are well-developed, with infrastructure, training programmes and a workforce of volunteers.
  • The skills and interests of volunteers are matched to positions (e.g. register or database).
  • Volunteers are supported in their voluntary work, for example by being provided with transportation or having the cost of parking reimbursed.

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  • There is a range of opportunities for older people to work.
  • Policy and legislation prevent discrimination on the basis of age.
  • Retirement is a choice, not mandatory.
  • There are flexible opportunities, with options for part-time or seasonal employment for older people.
  • There are employment programmes and agencies for older workers.
  • Employee organizations (e.g. trade unions) support flexible options, such as part-time and voluntary work, to enable more participation by older workers.
  • Employers are encouraged to employ and retain older workers.

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  • Opportunities for voluntary or paid work are known and promoted.
  • Transportation to work is available.
  • Workplaces are adapted to meet the needs of disabled people.
  • There is no cost to the worker of participating in paid or voluntary work.
  • There is support for organizations (e.g. funding or reduced insurance costs) to recruit, train and retain older volunteers.

Bonhommes

  • Advisory councils, boards of organizations, etc. include older people.
  • Support exists to enable older people to participate in meetings and civic events, such as reserved seating, support for people with disabilities, aids for the hard of hearing, and transportation.
  • Policies, programmes and plans for older people include contributions from older people.
  • Older people are encouraged to participate.

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  • There is support for older entrepreneurs and opportunities for self-employment (e.g. markets to sell farm produce and crafts, small business training, and micro-financing for older workers).
  • Information designed to support small and home-based business is in a formats suitable for older workers.

Argent

  • Older workers are fairly remunerated for their work.
  • Volunteers are reimbursed for expenses they incur while working.
  • Older workers’ earnings are not deducted from pensions and other forms of income support to which they are entitled.

Consultation

  • Training in post-retirement opportunities is provided for older workers.
  • Retraining opportunities, such as training in new technologies, is available to older workers.
  • Voluntary organizations provide training for their positions.

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  • Older people are respected and acknowledged for their contributions.
  • Employers and organizations are sensitive to the needs of older workers.
  • The benefits of employing older workers are promoted among employers.

  1. Checklist WHO
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please go to Library section.

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Information offer

  • A basic, universal communications system of written and broadcast media and telephone reaches every resident.
  • Regular and reliable distribution of information is assured by government or voluntary organizations.
  • Information is disseminated to reach older people close to their homes and where they conduct their usual activities of daily life.
  • Information dissemination is coordinated in an accessible community service that is well-publicized – a “one-stop” information centre.
  • Regular information and programme broadcasts of interest to older people are offered in both regular and targeted media.

Consultation
Oral communication

  • Oral communication accessible to older people is preferred, for instance through public meetings, community centres, clubs and the broadcast media, and through individuals responsible for spreading the word one-to-one.
  • People at risk of social isolation get information from trusted individuals with whom they may interact, such as volunteer callers and visitors, home support workers, hairdressers, doormen or caretakers.
  • Individuals in public offices and businesses provide friendly, person-to-person service on request.

Téléphone
Automated communication and equipment

  • Telephone answering services give instructions slowly and clearly and tell callers how to repeat the message at any time.
  • Users have the choice of speaking to a real person or of leaving a message for someone to call back.
  • Electronic equipment, such as mobile telephones, radios, televisions, and bank and ticket machines, has large buttons and big lettering.
  • The display panel of bank, postal and other service machines is well-illuminated and can be reached by people of different heights.

Réseau
Computers and the Internet

  • There is wide public access to computers and the Internet, at no or minimal charge, in public places such as government offices, community centres and libraries.
  • Tailored instructions and individual assistance for users are readily available

Recherche
Printed information

  • Printed information – including official forms, television captions and text on visual displays – has large lettering and the main ideas are shown by clear headings and bold-face type.

Lecture
Plain language

  • Print and spoken communication uses simple, familiar words in short, straightforward sentences.

  1. Checklist WHO
  2. Useful links

The checklist of essential features, from the Global Age-Friendly Cities Guide published by the World Health Organization in 2007, outlines the essential features of an age-friendly city. They are derived from the analysis of issues and concerns raised in eight areas of urban life by seniors and people who provide them with services in 35 cities worldwide that took part in the initial phase of this project.

To download all the checklists, please go to Library section.

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Service accessibility

  • Health and social services are well-distributed throughout the city, are conveniently co-located, and can be reached readily by all means of transportation.
  • Residential care facilities, such as retirement homes and nursing homes, are located close to services and residential areas so that residents remain integrated in the larger community.
  • Service facilities are safely constructed and are fully accessible for people with disabilities.
  • Clear and accessible information is provided about the health and social services for older people.
  • Delivery of individual services is coordinated and with a minimum of bureaucracy.
  • Administrative and service personnel treat older people with respect and sensitivity.
  • Economic barriers impeding access to health and community support services are minimal.
  • There is adequate access to designated burial sites.

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Offer of services

  • An adequate range of health and community support services is offered for promoting, maintaining and restoring health.
  • Home care services are offered that include health services, personal care and housekeeping.
  • Health and social services offered address the needs and concerns of older people.
  • Service professionals have appropriate skills and training to communicate with and effectively serve older people.

Personnes
Voluntary support

  • Volunteers of all ages are encouraged and supported to assist older people in a wide range of health and community settings.

Sécurité
Emergency planning and care

  • Emergency planning includes older people, taking into account their needs and capacities in preparing for and responding to emergencies.